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Members of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors contribute to and receive the Watch & Clock Bulletin, a bimonthly peer-reviewed journal. The Watch & Clock Bulletin features member research, answers to questions about timekeeping, book and media reviews, news from the Museum and Library and Research Center, and much more. Read a sample article here.

Members also receive the Mart & Highlights, a more informal buy-sell-trade and NAWCC news publication, packaged with the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

The NAWCC publishes book-length research prepared by NAWCC members and offered for sale to members and the public.


May/June 2015 Watch & Clock Bulletin

The clock on the front cover is the most important of the three tower clocks known to be made by John Eberman Jr., of Lancaster, PA. But this month’s article is all about the stand! After the clock was retired from service, it was displayed for many years on four pieces of iron pipe at the Lancaster County Heritage Society until the facility closed. The clock was donated to the NW&CM where it then sat on a pallet in the back room of the Museum for at least a year and a half for lack of funding for a decent stand. What a miserable retirement plan for such an important piece of horology!
Sometimes members who see a need have to volunteer to make things happen. Under the direction of Museum Director Noel Poirier and the collaboration of Tower Clock Chapter 134, Lancaster County Timber Frames, Inc., the Steinman Foundation, and other interested members, the clock now resides on a custom stand as the centerpiece of the Museum’s Rotunda. It is run daily. We hope Mr. Eberman is pleased!

—Photo by Mel Trago, Former NAWCC
Creative Services Production Leader

 

On the back cover: In 1968 most watch companies still thought of ladies’ watches as fashion accessories for cocktail parties and other more genteel pursuits. Eterna of Grenchen Switzerland made the bold move of pioneering a line of true sport watches for women under their “Kon-Tiki” line. The watches were built to withstand the rigors of scuba diving and other rugged activities, which up to that time had still been thought of by many as too risky or physically demanding for women. Read more about Eterna on page 296.

—Bruce Shawkey, image courtesy
of the NAWCC Library and Research Center

 

May/June 2015 Mart & Highlights

Sixty-four pages of advertisements including premiere auctions from around the world, NAWCC Regional ads, NAWCC information, Chapter Highlights, and hundreds of ads featuring horological items to buy/sell/trade.


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